Welcome to College

Torr during a filed training exercise on top of Mount Pain during training.

Alumni have advice for this fall’s incoming college freshmen

by Madison Griffith and Alec Howard

It can be scary going away to college. It’s the first time you’ll be on your own without your parents to help whenever you need them. Although you are slowly becoming an adult and think you can handle everything, some advice always helps.

Baxa and a sorority sister on the 2016 bid day for Delta Gamma at West Virginia University.

Baxa (right) and a sorority sister on the 2016 bid day for Delta Gamma at West Virginia University.

“I guess my best advice to an incoming freshman would be that it’s going to be a big adjustment, so be prepared. First semester might seem so easy, but it does get more difficult. Don’t be afraid to get involved and meet new people and try something new or something you don’t think you’d like. Sometimes you’ll be surprised. Also, don’t stress the small things because in the end it’s not worth it. When I say surprised, I could say I, 100 percent, did not want to join a sorority. I made fun of my roommate a lot for it. But I gave it a try, and I am so thankful. It gave me some of my closest friends and has taught me so much.” –2014 alumna Erika Baxa.

“You shouldn’t slack off senior year because you need to transition well into college. It’s a lot of hard work, so just keep on top of it and do everything you need to do to succeed.” –2015 alumni Clayton Friedman

“Drink a lot of coffee because there’s tons of long nights of studying. Make sure you have ways of studying that are easy for you, and do that all year to help you on exams.” –2014 alumni Jordan Friedman

Torr during a filed training exercise on top of Mount Pain during training.

Torr during a filed training exercise on top of Mount Pain during training.

“My advice to incoming freshmen would be this: College is your first real shot at being an adult. You have to balance party time with work time. You no longer can relax and push things off, because in the end it will catch up to you faster than you know it. If you can balance a good social life with a solid work life, college will be the best four years you will ever have.” –2014 Alumni Ian Torr.

“Don’t be afraid to step outside of your comfort zone. It’s important to get involved. College is where you meet your lifelong friends.” –2013 alumni Mikey Allen

“My biggest piece of advice for incoming freshman would be to get involved! By joining clubs, sports teams, anything you’re going to meet so many people and make so many connections that way. It’s more fun, and it will make you happy to just be able to walk anywhere on campus and see someone you know. The last thing you want to be in college is lonely, since you’re leaving a familiar home with familiar faces. Also, always communicate with your roommate. If you have a problem with something that’s going on, just tell them. You have to set boundaries and communicate because you’re living in close quarters with them for good chunks of time. Lastly, this is your time to grow into the person you’re going to be for the rest of your life. So spend time with yourself and figure out what makes you the happiest. Don’t get wrapped up in high school drama because that’s all behind you now. As clichéd and stupid as it sounds, going to college is like coming out of your cocoon and spreading your wings like a brand new butterfly. So have fun, be safe, and make the best of these four years. They go by faster than you think.” –2014 alumna Paige Cunningham

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